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CSIS House System

The CSIS has a 'House System' and every student, teacher will be assigned to a house. The House System is a traditional feature of schools all over the world. In fact Bishop Cotton School in Shimla, India was one of the first to start the House System in 1859. More recently the house system has been rejuvenated in the Harry Potter books and movies.

So how does the house system work? - The whole TWS community will be divided into a number of houses, which are named after four famous historical people.

The house system exists firstly to provide a system of care and team spirit for all students.A secondary feature of the house system is of competition between houses. The school sports day and debating competitions will be organised along inter-house lines.

House merit points for good behaviour and achievement will also be totaled up for comparison between houses. Additionally for poor behaviour - points may be taken away from the house by the Headmaster. The four houses will be as follows:- Shakespeare,Masefield, Kipling and Wordsworth.

It is important that all students recognise that they belong to a certain house, the loyalty you owe to your house and the pride in the prizes won by your own house. Extra house points will be given to students who are able to recite (at any time in the year) their house poem or for students who make a significant contribution to developing relationships, knowledge or skills within their house.

Shakespeare

All the World's a Stage

And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,

And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages.
At first, the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining school boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail unwillingly to school

And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow,

Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth.
And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part.
The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,

Red

rose

Masefield

Seafever

I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by,
And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking,

 

And a grey mist on the sea's face and a grey dawn breaking.
I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;

 

And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.
I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,

 

To the gull's way and the whale's way where the wind's like a whetted knife;
And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover,
And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick's over.

blue

blue

Kipling

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,

But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don't deal in lies,

Or being hated, don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise:
If you can dream - and not make dreams your master,

If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;

If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,

And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools:
If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it all on one turn of pitch-and-toss,

And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breath a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew

To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!"

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with kings - nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,

If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,

Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And - which is more - you'll be a Man, my son

green

tree

Wordsworth

Daffodil

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced,
but they Out-did the sparkling leaves in glee;

A poet could not be but gay,
In such a jocund company!
I gazed-and gazed-but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:
For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

yellow

dafodil